A complete guide to the Apollo Victoria Theatre

By | Posted on 12-Oct-2018

A complete guide to the Apollo Victoria Theatre

The Apollo Victoria Theatre hasn’t always been the theatre that audiences know today. It’s currently home to the West End production of Wicked. Find out more about the history of the Apollo Victoria Theatre with our guide packed with information about the Apollo Victoria Theatre and book your Wicked tickets now.

Apollo Victoria Theatre guide

Where is the Apollo Victoria Theatre?

The Apollo Victoria Theatre is located on Wilton Road (SW1V 1LG) in London. The nearest train station is London Victoria, which is opposite the venue.

How do I get to the Apollo Victoria Theatre?

The Apollo Victoria Theatre is in central London and easily accessible by rail or bus routes. The nearest rail station is Victoria, which is just outside the venue. Or, if you’re travelling by bus, the following routes will take you to the theatre:

Victoria Station: 2, 16, 36, 38, 73, 82, 170, 507, C2, C10
Wilton Road: 24, 52, 185, 436
Victoria Street: 44, 148, C1

Can I travel to the Apollo Victoria Theatre by tube?

If you’re travelling to the Apollo Victoria Theatre on the London Underground, it’s easily accessible by the District, Circle and Victoria lines to Victoria station.

What show is currently at the Apollo Victoria Theatre?

The Apollo Victoria Theatre is currently home to Wicked, which is one of the longest-running musicals in London.

When was Wicked first performed at the Apollo Victoria Theatre?

Wicked

Wicked was first performed at the Apollo Victoria Theatre on 7th September 2006, before making its official opening on 27th September 2006. The original cast was led by Idina Menzel, reprising her Broadway performance as Elphaba, Helen Dallimore as Glinda, Miriam Margolyes as Madame Morrible and Adam Garcia as Fiyero. The Apollo Victoria Theatre has welcomed over ten million people through its doors to see Wicked, the tale of the Wicked Witch of the West.

How many seats are inside the Apollo Victoria Theatre?

The Apollo Victoria Theatre has 2,328 seats. There are 1,298 stalls seats and 1,030 circle seats.

What restaurants are near the Apollo Victoria Theatre?

There are lots of restaurants offering delicious menus near the Apollo Victoria Theatre. Take a look at our top picks of restaurants near the Apollo Victoria Theatre and book your table today.

RestaurantCuisineReservation Times
Boisdale of BelgraviaScottish restaurant serving modern British dishes and the finest whiskies.6:00pm
Browns VictoriaClassic dishes and stylish cocktails.6:00pm
Hard Rock Cafe Old Park LaneFreshly prepared American-style meals offering food, entertainment and culture.5:00pm
Prezzo VictoriaIrresistible Italian dishes packed with fresh and flavourful Italy sourced ingredients12:30pm / 6:00pm
SicilyRelaxed Italian restaurant based on seasonal availability.12:30pm / 6:00pm
Sports Bar and Grill VictoriaFresh food in a sporting atmosphere.1:00pm / 6:00pm

When did the Apollo Victoria Theatre open?

Originally called the New Victoria, the building opened as a ‘super cinema’ on 15th October 1930 near Victoria train station. It cost £250,000 to build, equivalent to £151 million in today’s money.

What musicals have been performed at the Apollo Victoria Theatre?

The Sound of Music was the first musical to be performed at the Apollo Victoria Theatre, opening in 1981. The first London revival of the Rodgers and Hammerstein favourite played to sell-out audiences, the show set a new record for the highest attendance for a single week of any British musical production in history. With a score including “Lonely Goatherd” and “Do Re Mi”, The Sound of Music was performed for 13 months, closing in September 1982.

One of the most famous musicals to play at the Apollo Victoria Theatre is Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Starlight Express ran at the theatre from 27th March 1984 to 12th January 2002, making it the eighth-longest run of any show in the West End. Before the show began, the theatre had to be refurbished to make way for the set. Installing the split-level roller-skating arena around the entire auditorium meant many seats to be removed.