Nicole Kidman brings “theatrical Viagra” back to the West End

Photograph 51 has now closed. See a West End play here.

It has been announced that Academy Award Winner and Hollywood icon Nicole Kidman will make a welcome return to the West End stage later this year in a brand new production from The Michael Grandage Company at the Noel Coward Theatre. The star of stage and screen will feature in a brand new production of the play 'Photograph 51' by Anna Ziegler, which will be the UK première of the scientific drama.

Nicole Kidman is an internationally recognised celebrity who has achieved fame thanks to blockbuster films such as 'Cold Mountain', 'Moulin Rouge' 'The Hours' and 'The Others'. She is no stranger to the London stage, having performed in the Donmar Warehouse's 1998 production of 'The Blue Room' by David Hare which later went on to transfer to Broadway.

Critics at the time were enamoured with her performance, including a nude scene which prompted Charles Spencer, the chief critic of the Daily Telegraph to famously describe as “Pure Theatrical Viagra”. The statement became as famous as the show itself, and led to American publications highlighting the best seats in the house for the optimum view of Kidman throughout the production.

The Michael Grandage Company was formed at the end of 2011 as the director handed over the reigns of the Donmar Warehouse to Josie Rourke. They announced a 15 month season at the Noel Coward which included a number of revivals and new works, bringing names such as Ben Whishaw, Judi Dench, Jude Law and Sheridan Smith to the West End stage.

This new production is set to prove equally as popular, given the building anticipation surrounding Australian Nicole Kidman returning to the London stage. She will take on the challenging role of Rosalind Franklin, the female scientist whose photograph revealed the double-helix shape of DNA and became the starting point for research into genetic structure. Despite Franklin overseeing the initial discovery, her work was largely ignored and as the men went on to win the Nobel Prize, she was left out of the limelight.

Anna Ziegler's extraordinary play finally places the spotlight on Franklin and examines the  sacrifices made in the pursuit of science, love and a place in history.